Original Research

Justice perceptions of performance management practices in a company in the chemical industry

Thanasagree Govender, Anton Grobler, Yvonne Trintje Joubert
South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences | Vol 18, No 4 | a1344 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajems.v18i4.1344 | © 2015 Thanasagree Govender, Anton Grobler, Yvonne Trintje Joubert | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 20 March 2015 | Published: 27 November 2015

About the author(s)

Thanasagree Govender,, South Africa
Anton Grobler, UNISA, South Africa
Yvonne Trintje Joubert, UNISA, South Africa

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Abstract

The sustainability of corporations globally is becoming increasingly problematic. Combined with the unique challenges of an operating entity, this could potentially expose the profitability of sustainable businesses on a daily basis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate employees’ justice perceptions of performance management practices in a company in the chemical industry. The population includes all the employees in the chemical industry that was used in this study. A total of 140 questionnaires were issued to all the employees in an organisation which had undergone a performance appraisal and 102 respondents completed the surveys, giving a response rate of 72 per cent. A cross-sectional survey design was used in this study. The justice perceptions were measured according to an existing framework developed by Thurston and McNall (2010). The framework is founded on a hypothesised four-factor model constructed according to theories on organisational justice. The employees of the organisation in the chemical sector were involved in this study. Descriptive statistical analyses were used to measure perceptions of justice based on theories on organisational justice. The measuring instrument used was based on recognised models and theories. The study supports the construct validity of the measuring instrument and the reliability of the scales used. The justice constructs were used to identify specific items in the performance management practice that required improvement. The implications of the results are that continual interventions are required if employee commitment and productivity levels are to improve, resulting in a positive impact on business performance. Significant differences in perceptions by demographic groups were reported and discussed. This study explored the importance of understanding justice perceptions of performance management practices as an enabler for sustained business performance. Further, the study confirmed that justice perceptions have a direct impact on both the organisational climate and employee morale.


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