Original Research

Flexi work, financial well-being, work–life balance and their effects on subjective experiences of productivity and job satisfaction of females in an institution of higher learning

Leon T.B. Jackson, Edwina I. Fransman
South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences | Vol 21, No 1 | a1487 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajems.v21i1.1487 | © 2018 Leon T.B. Jackson, Edwina I. Fransman | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 13 October 2015 | Published: 29 March 2018

About the author(s)

Leon T.B. Jackson, WorkWell Research Unit for Economics and Management Sciences, Faculty of Economics and Management Sciences, Potchefstroom Business School, North-West University, South Africa
Edwina I. Fransman, North-West School of Business and Governance, Faculty of Economics and Management Sciences, North-West University, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Expressions such as ‘there are not enough hours in the day’ and ‘the 25 h workday’ or cliché statements such as ‘working 24/7’ have become common overtones in the way employees feel about time at work. Because of this ‘lack of time’ feeling, alternative work arrangements such as flexitime, telecommuting and practices such as work–life balance have emerged as popular topics for researchers, employees, organisations and the like in the past few decades.

 

Setting: Women are still the main caregivers of family members and households, and compared to men, they are less likely to be granted flexitime by their employers. It therefore seems realistic to imagine that women would suffer more from work–life conflict. Women still earn, on average, less than men and are more likely to have part-time jobs. This has an impact on the financial well-being of women. These issues have yet to be investigated in an institution of higher learning in South Africa.

 

Aim: This study was aimed at determining: (1) the relationship between flexi work, financial well-being and work–life balance, productivity and job satisfaction, (2) the role of flexible work, financial well-being and work–life balance in productivity and job satisfaction, and (3) the mediating effect of productivity (job satisfaction in the alternative model) in the relationship between flexible work, financial well-being and work–life balance and job satisfaction (productivity in the alternative model).

 

Methods: A cross-sectional survey was used with a convenience sample (n = 252) of female support employees, employed in a higher education institution in the North West province of South Africa.

 

Results: Findings of the study indicated a statistically significant relationship between the variables. Results indicated that financial well-being, work–life balance and productivity were statistically significant predictors of job satisfaction, and in addition, subjective experiences of productivity serve as partial mediators in the relationship between financial well-being and work–life balance on the one hand, and job satisfaction on the other hand.

 

Conclusion: It seems like financial well-being and work–life balance play a more important role in job satisfaction and that financial well-being and work–life balance are more important for job satisfaction through subjective experiences of productivity. It would therefore make sense to increase experiences of financial well-being and work–life balance to address experiences of low levels of job satisfaction and subjective experiences of productivity.


Keywords

flexible work; financial wellbeing; work-life balance; job satisfaction on productivity

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